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How to Make Your Own Journey Into Imagination

Journey into Imagination, the brand new series by BuzzFeed writer Katie Bierut, will explore how the idea of going “home” was embraced by the public.

In a series that will air on Friday, June 11 at 9 p.m.

ET, Katie will explore the history of the journey home and how it was embraced in the 1950s and 60s.

Katie, whose parents are former New York Times reporter Karen and Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Bill Gertz, will discuss the origin of the concept of going home in a story that will explore some of the people who took it to heart.

In her story, Katie reveals how her father, who was an insurance agent, and her mother, who worked for the state of Connecticut, were pioneers in the idea that “the trip home” was a way to spend time together. 

“My father worked in the insurance business, and he and I were both young and impressionable,” she wrote in her story.

“We wanted to go out with our friends and see if we could have some fun and meet new people.” 

“The idea of leaving home and returning to the land of the living is so powerful and so universal that it has been adopted in every culture and every age.

The journey home has become a cornerstone of American life,” she added.”

The journey home is what so many people want: to come home, to return to a familiar place, and to reconnect with those who love them.

It is what connects the people of today to those of tomorrow, and it has become the cornerstone of our daily lives.” 

Katie also explored the history and influence of the term “trip home” and what it meant for people who were not yet ready to embrace it.

In “How to Make your Own Journey into the Journey Home,” she will reveal how a man in his mid-50s who worked in a health insurance business was inspired to try to find his way home after a family member passed away. 

According to Katie, the man’s wife was able to convince him to visit his sister, who lived across the street, after she learned that he had been diagnosed with cancer. 

When Katie and her family visited her sister’s home in Connecticut, she had an epiphany. 

 “I was walking through her front yard when she leaned over and said, ‘Mom, look!

“I had never thought about it that way before, but it wasn’t long before I was talking about it with my sister. “

I knew I had found my way home, and I had just gotten that little epiphany that this was my true home.” “

I had never thought about it that way before, but it wasn’t long before I was talking about it with my sister.

I knew I had found my way home, and I had just gotten that little epiphany that this was my true home.” 

The journey Home is a word often used to describe a place that one has chosen to live.

In the 1950’s and 60’s, the concept was embraced as a way for people to spend their weekends, after work, or in between meetings. 

Katy explains that the term was not born overnight, but people were able to embrace the idea, as they began to see their loved ones as people who needed to be taken care of. 

The idea was eventually embraced by some of society’s top leaders, including President Dwight Eisenhower, who described the home as a place where people “shouldn’t be ashamed of their own condition, but should not be ashamed to make the effort to live well.” 

As the 1960s came to a close, however, the idea was abandoned as the country moved toward the Cold War.

Katie writes that in the 60s, the phrase “the journey home” did not have much traction and the term’s popularity began to wane. 

Today, Katie and the BuzzFeed team will examine the journey that many Americans take home to find their way home. 

Watch the full episode on BuzzFeed here. 

Follow Katie on Twitter @katziemarie.